Trustee Toolkit

AHA Trustee Services has created many trustee toolkit resources to help you improve your board and governance practices. Use the Type filter below to see specific types of Trustee Tools.

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The following is intended to be an example that boards should adapt to meet their individual needs. This self-assessment tool will provide you an opportunity to evaluate our committee’s performance and contributions.
Be sure every member fully understands his or her accountability, responsibilities and the expectations of the office, and document it all in a written position description...
Regular board self-evaluation is integral to effective governance. Use the questions in the attachment to assess whether your board is getting maximum mileage from its self-evaluation process.
The American Hospital Association’s report, Hospitals and Care System of the Future, describes a series of “must do” strategies and future core competencies hospitals will need as they transform themselves from first curve to second curve delivery systems, driven by a shift from volume-driven to value-driven payment systems.
Governance responsibilities today are so significant that board members must bring more than commitment to the mission and interest in serving. As William Bowen writes, every trustee should bring a “specific competence or experience needed on the board.” This sample provides a board policy statement on competency-based recruitment, election and re-election of board members. Use it to customize a process for your board.
AHA’s Center for Healthcare Governance would like to thank Sierra Vista Regional Health Center and its Board of Trustees for sharing this sample mentoring feedback form.
See attached sample strategic planning policy.
The American Hospital Association’s report, Hospitals and Care System of the Future, describes the transformation of health care delivery from first curve to second curve, driven by a shift from volume driven to value-driven payment systems. While there is no single “end state” model that suitable for all organizations or communities, the report offers a compelling vision of “care systems” that are accountable, integrated and coordinated around patient and community needs.”
Establishing well-organized and consistent governance processes and procedures enables the board to be most productive, and ensures that its time is allocated to the most critical topics. Agendas should reflect the most important strategic issues and priorities, and make efficient use of trustees’ valuable and limited time; meetings should be designed to maximize trustees’ ability to engage in critical dialogue; and committees and task forces should be used to enable the board to focus time on high-level strategic discussion.
For boards to participate in shaping their new organization, they must be currently performing at an extremely high level. The following is a list of four practices that hospital and health system boards must be engaged in today, in order to be successful in the future.